All News | Boards | Chips | Devices | Software | LinuxDevices.com Archive | About | Contact | Subscribe
Follow LinuxGizmos:
Twitter Facebook Pinterest RSS feed
*   get email updates   *

Pico-ITX SBC jump-starts the mighty i.MX8 QuadMax

Jan 13, 2020 — by Eric Brown — 4578 views

iWave’s “iW-Rainbow-G27S” Pico-ITX SBC runs Linux or Android on an i.MX8 QuadPlus or QuadMax with up to 8GB LPDDR4, 2x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, 802.11ac/BT, M.2, HDMI in and out, and -40 to 85°C support.

iWave produces a lot of compute modules, such as last year’s i.MX8M Mini or Nano based iW-RainboW-G34M-SM, but single board computers are far less common. The last one we covered was the COM-like, Snapdragon 820 based iW-RainboW-G25S, which followed an earlier, NXP i.MX6 driven iW-RainboW-G15S and older products built around Freescale/NXP’s Vybrid, i.MX50, and i.MX27. The new iW-Rainbow-G27S Pico-ITX form-factor SBC showcases NXP’s i.MX8 QuadPlus/QuadMax. This is only the second i.MX8 Quad based SBC we’ve seen, following Seco’s 3.5-inch SBC-C43.



iW-Rainbow-G27S
(click image to enlarge)

The i.MX8 Quad/Plus/Max is the most powerful of the growing number of i.MX8 variants. These include the upcoming, NPU-enabled i.MX8M Plus, which is sort of like a hybrid of the i.MX8 Quad and low-power i.MX8M Nano. iWave previously used the i.MX8 QuadMax on its iW-RainboW-G27M SMARC module, but the module is not used on the iW-Rainbow-G27S.

Designed for high-speed networking, edge computing, industrial automation, 4K imaging, e-cockpit, and intelligent data centers, iWave’s latest SBC supports the two higher-end models: the QuadMax with 2x Cortex-A72 cores and 4x Cortex-A53 cores and the QuadPlus with a single Cortex-A72 and 4x -A53. Like the quad -A53 Quad model, the SoCs offer 2x Cortex-M4F real-time cores, 2x Vivante GPU/VPU cores, and a HiFi4 DSP.

The QuadMax features the GC7000XSVX GPU while the QuadPlus has a “Lite” version. Video support is the same, however, with [email protected] decoding and the ability to drive up to 4x HD displays.

On the iW-Rainbow-G27S, You can configure the i.MX8’s power management system, managed by dual PF8100 PMICs, so that the Cortex-A cores can be deactivated while the Cortex-M4F cores stay alert to monitor the system in low power mode. The main cores can be activated either using a predefined wake-up time or from a user-defined interrupt.


iW-RainboW-G27M

The iW-Rainbow-G27S is supported with Linux 4.14.98 and Android Pie 9.0.0 for the Cortex-A cores and QNX 7.0.0 for the Cortex-M4 cores. The company also supplies the open source type 1 Xen hypervisor to enable a virtualized, multi-OS implementation. This Xen stack enables an environment in which “generated domains are fully secure and independent from others, ensuring a multi-application platform running on independent displays, offering failover safe performance,” says iWave. The same Xen implementation is also available on its QuadMax based iW-RainboW-G27M module.

iWave’s SBC adds a Security Microcontroller (SECO) that verifies the authenticity of the U-Boot, Linux, and RTOS binaries. The binaries are signed with a certificate stored in “immutable” storage. The SECO also contains a Cryptographic Acceleration and Assurance Module (CAAM). Other security features on the SBC include High Assurance Boot (HAB), encrypted keys, and secure firmware OTA (Over the Air) updates.

— ADVERTISEMENT —


The feature set is much like that of Seco’s larger SBC-C43. The iW-Rainbow-G27S offers a second USB 3.0 host port while the SBC-C43 features soldered memories. The main difference is in expansion. The SBC-C43 provides M.2 E- and B-key slots plus more separate, dedicated interfaces for I/O like MIPI-CSI and LVDS while iWave’s board instead gives you 3x proprietary expansion connectors and limited dedicated connectors (see spec list below).

Highlights for both SBCs include dual GbE, WiFi-ac, HDMI 2.0a in and out, and CAN support. While the SBC-C43 provides commercial and industrial models, iWave’s SBC provides only an industrial -40 to 85°C SKU.

Specifications listed for the iW-Rainbow-G27S include:

  • Processor — NXP i.MX8 with VPU and HiFi4 DSP:
    • i.MX8 QuadMax — 2x Cortex-A72, 4x Cortex-A53, 2x Cortex-M4F, 2x Vivante GC7000 / XVSX GPU/VPU
    • i.MX8 QuadPlus — 1x Cortex-A72, 4x Cortex-A53, 2x Cortex-M4F, 2x GC7000Lite / XVSX GPU/VPU
  • Memory/storage:
    • 4GB or 8GB LPDDR4
    • 8GB eMMC (expandable)
    • MicroSD slot
    • SATA via M.2 B-key (see expansion below)
  • Networking:
    • 2x GbE ports
    • 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac + Bluetooth 5.0
    • M.2 with nano-SIM (see expansion below)
  • Media I/O:
    • HDMI 2.0a output port up to 4K
    • Micro-HDMI 2.0a input port
    • 40-pin eDP connector up to 4K
    • MIPI-DSI/CSI, LVDS, SAI via expansion connectors (see farther below)
    • Quadruple display support
    • Audio I/O jack with I2S audio codec
  • Other I/O:
    • 2x USB 3.0 host ports
    • Micro-USB 2.0 OTG port
    • RS-232 interface
    • CAN interface
    • Serial debug with optional JTAG and anti-tamper headers
  • Expansion:
    • M.2 B-key slot — 2x PCIe, USB 3.0 and 2.0, SATA, I2S, I2C, and HSIC with nano-SIM slot
    • Expansion Connector 1 — 4 lane MIPI-DSI and -CSI/I2C, SAI, CAN, QSPI, DMA/I2C, UART, M40
    • Expansion Connector 2 — 4 lane MIPI-DSI, 4-lane LVDS, CAN/SPDIF, DMA/I2C, SPI
    • Expansion Connector 3 — 4 lane MIPI-CSI, MIPI-CSI/I2C, 2x 4-lane LVDS, PWM, SPI, M41
  • Other features — RTC with battery connector
  • Power – 12/2A DC input via external adapter
  • Operating temperature — -40 to 85°C
  • Dimensions — 100 x 72mm (Pico-ITX)
  • Operating system — Linux 4.14.98; Android Pie 9.0.0; QNX 7.0.0; Xen

 
Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the iW-Rainbow-G27S. More information may be found in iWave’s announcement and the iW-Rainbow-G27S product page.

 

(advertise here)


Print Friendly, PDF & Email
PLEASE COMMENT BELOW

Please comment here...