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Rate your favorite hacker SBCs, win prizes

May 8, 2014  |  Eric Brown
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[Updated May 9] — What makes a good open, hacker SBC? You tell us: participate in our quick survey, and optionally enter a raffle for a shirt, hat, mug, or USB drive.

Together with Linux.com, the Linux Foundation’s community website, we have set up a survey on SurveyMonkey with 32 open spec single-board computers. Pick your favorite three boards and answer a few questions about what you’re looking for in an open, hacker SBC and enter the optional drawing for a chance to win cool Tux, embedded Linux, and Android gear. Five randomly selected winners will receive a T-shirt, sweatshirt, hat, mug, or USB drive.

Farther below, we offer brief summaries of the 32 boards, with links to product pages. (OK, if you’re anxious to vote without reading our fastidiously formatted summaries, the survey link is right here: SurveyMonkey SBC Survey.)

Once the 10-day survey is completed, we’ll compile our official list of the “Top 10 Open SBCs” and analyze the results for trends.

After filling out the brief survey on SurveyMonkey, enter your email address at the end. Your email address will only be used in case you’re chosen as a winner. (Note: You must be 18 years or older, and no purchase is necessary to enter or win. Void where prohibited.)

We are particularly interested in hands-on experience, but we also realize that relatively few people have used more than a few of these boards, so it’s not a prerequisite. Even if you’ve only learned about some of these boards from LinuxGizmos.com or other sites, by word of mouth, or from a demo at a friend’s house, store, or tech show, we’d like to hear from you. Also, if your favorite board isn’t on the list, you can add it as an alternative in the text entry boxes provided within the survey, and we will make note of those.

This survey is being conducted in collaboration with Linux.com, which also announced it today.
 

Jump to SBC Spec Summaries

 
How we created the survey’s SBC list

The SBCs on our list are all shipping, even if only recently. They must offer open source Linux and/or Android OS images, or offer links to other free sources. The projects must offer schematics and other hardware reference materials for at least most of the board’s features and components. (For example, in the case of the increasingly common “sandwich-style SBCs,” which consist of a COM+baseboard combination, the baseboard schematic should be readily available for free download and application-specific modification.) At a minimum, licensing should enable third parties to build products at least for small runs of non-profit applications.

It’s also essential that the boards are backed up with at least some community website features, with a forum or something similar, where users can ask technical questions and exchange tips. Ideally, there should be additional documentation, tutorials, and other resources.

The boards need to supply a few real-world ports at a minimum, as opposed to a computer-on-module (COM) that requires a baseboard. On the other hand, a growing number of new contenders are modular COM+baseboard combos sold as integrated SBCs. Some of these sandwich-style SBCs (perhaps we should call them “DBCs”) are also available with enclosures as miniPCs, but they must also be sold as boards.

For space reasons, our summaries below do not always list OS support. The vast majority, however, support Android and one or more Linux distros. A few are Linux only, and some are more oriented toward Android, but also support Linux.

Also note that after the name of the board, we often list more than one vendor name. This is because open SBCs are often collaborations among manufacturers, open source projects, and distributors. We list distributors when they appear to be the sole distributor of the product. The listed prices are the lowest we found, but forgive us if we did not find the ultimate bargain price. Prices change over time, and in some cases vary significantly depending on the distributor.

The criteria for choosing an open-spec single board computer are almost as varied as the devices you can build from them. Some people place the highest value on open source licensing and transparency, while others are merely looking for cost savings. (The $35 price tag on the Raspberry Pi may not be the only reason for its dominance, but it sure helped.) Meanwhile, others want more help than they can affordably receive from embedded SBCs designed to serve volume product manufacturers, or are seeking a community of like-minded hobbyists to share tips and designs.

 
Hot prospects for our next survey

Finally, you may have noted that some hot new boards you’ve read about are not on the list posted farther below. That’s because they haven’t shipped yet. Perhaps on next year’s list we’ll see products like:

  • Arduino TRE — Arduino’s first SBC to run a full Linux distro (on a TI Sitara AM335x SoC) along with the usual Arduino goodies
  • HummingBoard — SolidRun’s Raspberry Pi clone with modular COM+baseboard setup, aimed at its CuBox developers
  • Logi — ValentFX SBCs that combine FPGA circuitry with plug-in Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone Black boards used like COMs
  • MinnowBoard Max — Intel’s $99, second-gen hacker board featuring a new Atom E3800 and Arduino compatibility
  • Red Pitaya — Xilinx Zynq ARM/FPGA based SBC for open source Linux-based measurement and control
  • Warpboard — Freescale’s tiny, single-core i.MX6 based SBC, designed for wearables and Internet of Things (IoT) devices

If you hear of any other cool new boards that are on the way, let us know in the comments area at the bottom of this post. Meanwhile, here are the open-spec boards you can buy now — and don’t forget to vote and enter the raffle by clicking below.

Click here to participate in our survey and enter the raffle:
SurveyMonkey SBC Survey


 
Summaries of all 32 SBCs appear below…

 

86Duino and 86Duino One

Summary:

Description — DM&P’s 86Duino features Arduino-compatible expansion and a modular COM+baseboard approach. For $30 more, the 86Duino One model supplies the same RAM, as well as Ethernet, USB, and MicroSD connections, and adds HD audio and more expansion I/O.

 

A10-OLinuXino-Lime

Summary:

  • Company/project — Olimex, OLinuXino, Mouser
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A10 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $42

Description — This tiny (84 x 60mm) Android- and Linux-ready SBC is also available with an optional mini-PC enclosure. I/O includes microSD, SATA, Ethernet, and HDMI, plus three USB ports and 160 GPIOs.

 

A20-OLinuXino-Micro

Summary:

  • Company/project — Olimex, OLinuXino, Mouser
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; optional 4GB NAND flash ($14 more) with preloaded Android
  • Price — $77

Description — The faster, dual-core OLinuXino model is 1080p-ready and has all the I/O of the Lime, but doubles the RAM and adds VGA, LCD/touch, and audio I/O. The A20-OLinuXino-Micro also adds UEXT expansion connectors, with optional modules.

 

APC Rock

Summary:

  • Company/project — Via Technologies
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Via Wondermedia (1x Cortex-A9 @ 800MHz)
  • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM; 4GB NAND flash
  • Price — $56

Description — The APC Rock uses Via’s 170 x 80mm neo-ITX form-factor, and runs Android and Linux, including Firefox OS. I/O includes microSD, 10/100 Ethernet, audio, three USB 2.0 ports, and expansion headers. The board is also offered as part of a cardboard-enclosed “APC Paper” mini-PC.

 

ArndaleBoard-K

Summary:

  • Company/project — ArndaleBoard.org, InSignal, Pyrustek
  • Product page
  • Processor — Samsung Exynos 5250 (2x Cortex-A15 cores @ 1.7GHz, 4x Cortex-A7 cores @ 1.2GHz); Mali-T604 GPU
  • Memory — 2GB LPDDR3e RAM
  • Price — $259

Description — The ArndaleBoard-K replaces the earlier OrigenBoard, and is similarly backed by Samsung and manufacturing partner InSignal. It’s implemented as a COM+baseboard assembly, consisting of a tiny COM that integrates a hexa-core Exynos 5250 SoC along with a few other components, plugged into a feature-rich baseboard loaded with sensors. There are also modular wireless, audio, and camera modules, plus an optional display.

 

Arndale Octa Board

Summary:

  • Company/project — ArndaleBoard.org, InSignal, Pyrustek
  • Product page
  • Processor — Samsung Exynos 5420 Octa (4x Cortex-A15 @ 1.8GHz and 4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.3GHz); ARM Mali T-628 MP6
  • Memory — 3GB LPDDR3e RAM
  • Price — $179

Description — ArndaleBoard.org’s new Octa board sports Samsung’s faster new Exynos 5420 SoC. It offers generous helpings of display (HDMI, eDP, and MIPI DSI) and USB connections, plus MIPI-CSI camera support and an optional wireless module.

 

BD-SL-i.MX6 (formerly SABRE Lite)

Summary:

  • Company/project — Boundary Devices, Element14
  • Product page
  • Processor — Freescale i.MX6Quad (4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1GHz)
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $199

Description — Freescale’s SABRE Lite dev board for the i.MX6 was spun off as a fully open spec “BD-SL-i.MX6″ SBC, sold by Boundary Devices and Element14. The Linux-ready board features rich I/O including RGB, LVDS, and HDMI display connections, dual camera ports, a GbE port, dual SD slots, and a SATA interface. Three USB ports are provided, along with PCIe expansion and a CAN port.

 

Banana Pi

Summary:

  • Company/project — Lemaker.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A10 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $35

Description — This Raspberry Pi clone has the same port positions, 24-pin header layout, and educational focus as the RasPi, but has a faster processor. The SBC adds to the RasPi’s feature set with twice the RAM, plus I/O including a SATA and micro-USB port.

 

BeagleBone Black

Summary:

  • Company/project — BeagleBone.org, CirtcuitCo
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — TI Sitara AM3358 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz)
  • Memory — 512MB RAM; 4GB flash
  • Price — $55

Description — The old $45 BB Black is gone, and a new $55 Rev C model with double the flash (4GB) takes its place. The now Debian-ready SBC still gives you a lot for your money, especially in expansion headers, but the real draw here is the large, vibrant Beagleboard.org community.

 

Cosmic+

Summary:

  • Company/project — Phytec
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Freescale Vybrid VF6xx (1x Cortex-A5 @ 500MHz); Cortex-M4 @ 167MHz
  • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM, 512MB NAND flash
  • Price — $65

Description — Here, again, we have modular COM+baseboard SBC sandwich. The Cosmic+ features a Phycore-Vybrid COM with a Freescale Vybrid SoC that combines the rarely seen Cortex-A5 core running Linux, plus a microcontroller unit (MCU) running Freescale’s MQX RTOS. The combo’s I/O includes a serial port and dual 60-pin connectors. For $10 less, you can scrap the SoC’s MCU feature by choosing a “Cosmic” version instead, but what’s the point?

 

Cubieboard2

Summary:

  • Company/project — Cubieboard.org, Wang and Tom Development, Ltd.
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM, 4GB NAND flash
  • Price — $59

Description — Identical to the original Cubieboard except for upgrading to the A20 SoC, the Cubieboard2 supports Android and Linux, and offers SATA, microSD, Ethernet, HDMI, and dual USB ports. It also supplies a 96-pin expansion connector.

 

CubieTruck (Cubieboard3)

Summary:

  • Company/project — Cubieboard.org, Wang and Tom Development, Ltd.
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM, optional NAND or TSD flash
  • Price — $89

Description — The CubieTruck offers everything the Cubieboard2 does, and more, but has fewer expansion pins (54) and lacks standard flash. You can choose between dual microSD slots, or a mix of microSD and flash options. New features include a generous 2GB of RAM, plus WiFi, Bluetooth, gigabit Ethernet, VGA, and SPDIF ports.

 

Galileo

Summary:

  • Company/project — Intel
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Intel Quark X1000 (1x Pentium-compatible core @ 400MHz)
  • Memory — 256MB DRAM
  • Price — $60

Description — This Internet of Things oriented SBC runs Linux on Intel’s low-power Quark CPU and offers Arduino compatibility. Other features include microSD, Ethernet, GPIO, analog inputs, dual USBs, JTAG, and serial ports. Prices range widely, but Fry’s has it for a low $60, and Intel is giving away 5,000 free boards to developers.

 

Gizmo

Summary:

  • Company/project — AMD, GizmoSphere.org, SemiconductorStore.com
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — AMD G-Series T40E APU (1x x86 @ 1GHz) with A55E controller hub
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 SDRAM
  • Price — $189

Description — This unrestricted, open spec version of AMD’s Gizmo SBC is based on its x86-based G-Series APU. The Gizmo offers VGA, DisplayPort, audio, SATA, and USB ports. There’s also GPIO and analog I/O, plus PCIe expansion. For $10 more, you get a dev kit version with an expansion board, a probe, and a Linux or Android image.

 

Hackberry A10

Summary:

  • Company/project — Miniand
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A10 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 512MB (optional 1GB) DDR3 RAM (100MB reserved for GPU), 4GB NAND flash
  • Price — $65

Description — This Android-oriented Allwinner A10 vehicle is showing its age, but is still notable for its built-in WiFi, full-sized SD slot, analog video outputs, and four-pin serial header. Other features include HDMI, audio, Ethernet, and dual USB ports.

 

IGEPv5 Community Edition

Summary:

  • Company/project — ISEE
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — TI OMAP5432 (2x Cortex-A15 cores @ 1.7GHz); POWERVR SGX544 GPU; 2x Cortex-M4 MCUs
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM, optional NAND flash
  • Price — $207

Description — This high-end Cortex-A15 newcomer from Barcelona is a community version of a commercial SBC. The 135 x 95mm SBC supports Yocto OE Linux and Android, and provides gigabit Ethernet, HDMI, DisplayPort, and five USB ports, including a 3.0 OTG version. It offers extensive expansion interfaces and supports industrial temperatures.

 

Improv

Summary:

  • Company/project — Make Play Live (Coherent Theory LLC), Vault Technology
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB RAM; 4GB NAND flash
  • Price — $75

Description — Aaron Seigo and the KDE Plasma Active community, which backed the open source Spark tablet, switched to the Improv SBC instead of the planned Vivaldi tablet, which is still on the roadmap. The tiny Improv, which similarly runs Meego-based Mer Linux with KDE, offers swappable CPU and feature cards using a modular EOMA-68 form-factor. The sandwich-style (COM+baseboard) Improv can stand alone, or can be plugged into a laptop dock.

 

i.MX6 Rex

Summary:

  • Company/project — Fedevel, Voipac
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Freescale i.MX6Dual (2x Cortex-A9 @ 1GHz); single and quad-core models optional
  • Memory — 512MB soldered DDR3 RAM, expandable to 4GB
  • Price — $235

Description — This modular, credit card sized COM+baseboard combo was developed by Slovakia-based Fedeval to support its embedded training courses. The i.MX6 Rex features dual microSD slots, plus CFAST and SATA storage. The Rex offers extensive I/O and ample expansion, including PCIe, dual Mini-PCIe, and dual SIM slots.

 

MarsBoard RK3066

Summary:

  • Company/project — Haoyu Electronics, MarsBoard.com
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Rockchip RK3066 (2x Cortex-A9 @ 1.6GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM, expandable to 2GB; 4GB eMMC NAND flash, expandable to 8GB
  • Price — $60

Description — The MarsBoard RK3066 replaces earlier Allwinner-fueled MarsBoards, and similarly runs Linux and Android. The modular, COM+baseboard design incorporates a generous five USB ports and dual gigabit Ethernet ports, along with HDMI, S/PDIF, IR, and camera interfaces.

 

MinnowBoard

Summary:

Description — You can now buy the MinnowBoard for a discounted $189, but you’ll probably want to wait until July for the $99, Atom E3800 based MinnowBoard Max. The original model runs a Yocto-compatible Angstrom Linux on an older Atom E640. The extensive I/O includes dual PCIe interfaces.

 

Odroid-U3

Summary:

  • Company/project — Hardkernel, Odroid project
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor –Samsung Exynos 4412 Prime (4x Cortex-A9 @ 1.7GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 2GB LP-DDR2 SDRAM
  • Price — $59

Description — The Samsung Exynos 4 based Odroid-U3 is software compatible with the discontinued U2, and supports Linux and Android KitKat. The price is kept low due to the lack of flash, but microSD and eMMC expansion options are available. Other I/O includes micro-HDMI, Ethernet, audio, and four USB ports. The 83 x 48 x 22mm dimensions reflect the built-in heat sink.

 

Odroid-XU

Summary:

  • Company/project — Hardkernel, Odroid project
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor –Samsung Exynos 5410 Octa (4x Cortex-A15 @ 1.6GHz and 4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.2GHz); PowerVR SGX544MP3 GPU
  • Memory — 2GB LPDDR3 RAM
  • Price — $169

Description — The Odroid-XU sports an Exynos 5410 octa-core, but it’s reportedly due for an “XU2″ replacement featuring a faster Exynos 5420 (1.8GHz/1.3GHz), now found on the rival Arndale Octa. The XU provides microSD and eMMC flash expansion, six USB ports, and a micro-HDMI port. For $30 more, the XU+E┬ámodel adds power analysis sensors.

 

Parallella

Summary:

  • Company/project — Adapteva, Parallella.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor –Xilinx Zynq-7020 or -7010 SoC (2x Cortex-A9 @ 667MHz plus FPGA); 16-core Epiphany RISC coproc.
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $99

Description — Aimed at power-efficient server clustering applications and parallel programming research, the Parallella features a Zynq ARM/FPGA SoC running Ubuntu, plus a homegrown 16-core Epiphany coprocessor. I/O includes microSD, gigabit Ethernet, micro-HDMI, and dual USB ports. Four 60-pin connectors provide for Epiphany and FPGA extensions.

 

PhoenixA20

Summary:

  • Company/project — Anichips, Swiftboard.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; 4GB NAND flash
  • Price — $59

Description — The makers of the Allwinner A10 based SwiftBoard have launched the first pico-ITX form factor board based on the dual-core A20 SoC. The 100 x 72mm PhoenixA20 offers multiple display and wireless interfaces, as well as camera and Ethernet ports. The Android- and Linux-ready board supports -20 to 70° temperatures, which is remarkable for such a low-cost SBC.

 

Radxa Rock

Summary:

  • Company/project — Radxa
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Rockchip RK3188 (4x Cortex-A9 @ 1.6GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM; 8GB NAND flash (1GB/4GB on $69 Radxa Rock Lite)
  • Price — $89

Description — This tiny, 100 x 80mm SBC runs Android or Linux on the quad-core RK3188. A Lite version with half the memory sells for $20 less. Both models offer WiFi and Bluetooth, as well as real-world HDMI, Ethernet, USB, and S/PDIF ports. Expansion headers support many more interfaces. Add $10 for a case and antenna.

 

Raspberry Pi Model B

Summary:

  • Company/project — Raspberry Pi Foundation
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Broadcom BCM2835 (1x ARM11 @ 700MHz); Broadcom VideoCore IV GPU
  • Memory — 512MB SDRAM
  • Price — $35

Description — New documentation for the VideoCore IV GPU makes the world’s leading hacker SBC more open. The specs may be underpowered, but the Pi is power efficient, expandable, and backed up by a huge community and hardware/software ecosystem. There’s also a stripped down, $25 Model A, and a new COM version.

 

RIoTboard

Summary:

  • Company/project — Newark Element14, RIoTboard.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Freescale i.MX6Solo (1x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1GHz)
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; 4GB eMMC flash
  • Price — $74

Description — The RIoT (“Revolutionizing the Internet of Things”) board runs Android or Linux on a low-power, single-core Cortex-A9 SoC. The 120 x 75mm SBC offers several advantages over the similar WandBoard Solo, including twice the RAM, built-in flash, and many more USB ports.

 

SAMA5D3 Xplained

Summary:

  • Company/project — Newark Element14, Atmel
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Atmel SAMA5D3 (1x Cortex-A5 @ 536MHz)
  • Memory — 256MB DDR2 RAM; 256MB NAND flash
  • Price — $79

Description — Atmel and its Linux4SAM developers site collaborated with Newark Element14 to produce this Linux-ready SBC in order to showcase Atmel’s new SAMA5D3 processor. Designed for wearables and other low-power devices, the 125 x 75mm SBC includes dual LAN ports and Arduino compatibility.

 

SoCkit Development Kit

Summary:

  • Company/project — Arrow Electronics. Terasic, RocketBoards.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Altera Cyclone V SX (2x Cortex-A9 with Stratix V-like FPGA)
  • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $299

Description — Just as the ZedBoard and MicroZed open up the Xylinx Zynq, Arrow’s SoCkit expands the playing field for Altera’s own hybrid ARM/FPGA SoC. Interfaces include VGA, audio, gigabit Ethernet, and USB, plus high speed expansion with off-the-shelf or custom expansion cards. Terasic assisted on the FPGA integration.

 

Udoo Quad

Summary:

  • Company/project — Udoo
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Freescale i.MX6Quad (4x Cortex-A9 @ 1GHz) or optional DualLite
  • Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 MCU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $135

Description — This former Kickstarter project is giving Wandboard.org some competition. The 110 x 85mm Udoo Quad features a Cortex-M3 based Arduino Due subsystem. There are also a pair of lower cost, dual-core i.MX6DualLite options: a $99 Udoo Dual that lacks SATA and the Quad’s faster Vivante GC355 GPU, and a $79 Dual Basic that foregoes WiFi and gigabit Ethernet.

 

Wandboard Quad

Summary:

  • Company/project — Wandboard.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Freescale i.MX6Quad (4x Cortex-A9 @ 1GHz) or optional Solo or Dual
  • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM (1GB for Dual, 512MB for Solo)
  • Price — $129

Description — Wandboard.org is one of the more popular open board communities, although like a handful of other offerings listed here, the Wandboard is designed as a modular, sandwich-style, COM+baseboard assembly that makes it more of a “DBC” than an SBC. The combo’s COM includes the i.MX6 and RAM, plus wireless, SD, and camera interfaces. A $99 DualLite-based Wandboard Dual loses the SATA, and a $79, single-core Solo version skips the wireless radios.

 

ZedBoard

Summary:

  • Company/project — Avnet
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor –Xilinx Zynq-7020 (2x Cortex-A9 @ 667MHz plus FPGA)
  • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM; 4GB SD card
  • Price — $395

Description — Avnet seems more focused on its similarly Zynq-based MicroZed modules than on the ZedBoard, which is currently out of stock. The pricey SBC offers the I/O you’d expect from a typical $100 ARM board, but supplements it with extensive FPGA-based expansion I/O.

 

 

Click here to participate in our survey and enter the raffle:
SurveyMonkey SBC Survey

 

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PLEASE COMMENT BELOW

11 Responses to “Rate your favorite hacker SBCs, win prizes”

  1. jezra says:

    I like the Open Source board that doesn’t require proprietary video drivers. ;)

    • Alex says:

      The SAMA5 boards, then? I’ve been coveting that device lately. No 3D, but good 2D capabilities and binary-blob free. I hope it becomes a popular dev board choice, it’s a fairly powerful device with a recent ARM ISA, but it eschews the complexity of SoCs like the one on the Raspberry Pi. Whose idea was it to make an educational computer where the GPU and its firmware are in charge of the system, anyway?

  2. zpzap says:

    I would buy immediately the first board with 3 lan for routing purposes.
    Afaik there’s not even one with 2 :-(

  3. Brent Crosby says:

    The CFA-10036 would qualify. Available with a roomy breakout board for hacking:
    http://www.crystalfontz.com/product/CFA10037

    or in a compact embedded PC with 5″ LCD:
    http://www.crystalfontz.com/product/CFA921TS

    Lots of GPIO (90+).

    +zipzap: i.MX287 version has 2x MAC (but only one phy on our board)

  4. jezra says:

    Wait a second!? Why is Improv on this list?

  5. rhabyt says:

    Why wasn’t the Arduino Yun on this list? It runs Linux on an Atheros AR9331. I’ve moved to using them for battery projects because the power management is better than the RPi. Its got great IoT ease of use with Temboo and then full-ish Linux behind it.
    Judging by the the interest at the Bay Area Maker Faire last weekend (more people talking about it than the Beaglebone), I bet it would have placed in the top ten, if you had put it on the list.

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