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Catalog of 81 open-spec, hacker friendly SBCs

Jun 1, 2016 — by Eric Brown — 35,908 views
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[Updated: June 22] — This page contains summaries of 81 Linux-friendly, open-spec SBCs. It was created to accompany our 2016 Hacker SBC Survey, which ran from June 2 to 17.

LinuxGizmos.com and Linux.com (the Linux Foundation’s community site) sponsored a 14-day SurveyMonkey survey that asked readers to choose their favorite three Linux- or Android-based open-spec single-board computers from a list of 81. The summaries below provide brief descriptions and specs of each board in the survey, along with links to related coverage here at LinuxGizmos.com and at supplier product pages. The survey results are here.

 
Ground rules for inclusion in the survey

Our definition of an open-spec, community backed hacker SBC is fairly loose. The boards must ship with extensive specs, as well as schematics for at least the carrier portion of sandwich-style boards. Additionally, they need to offer open source Linux or Android distributions for download. In the case of recently introduced SBCs, we allow a bit of a grace period to post the above resources in a timely manner, although we recognize there’s a growing problem of projects that are tardy in posting schematics, or more importantly for most users, optimized firmware.

The boards must also offer at least some community and technical support for individual developers. If we were voting ourselves, we’d give extra credit to projects with forums, tutorials, and other resources for sharing tips and designs based on the SBCs. Ideally, there would be explicit open source licensing for creating derivative hardware, although this is not required.

We could easily have boosted the current survey’s 81 board total to 100 or more, if we had included every SKU of every model offered by vendors. Instead, to make the list more coherent we have grouped some very similar models together, mentioning differences in configuration in text, and we have omitted some older boards when newer, very similar, boards clearly supersede them.

All told, we have added 16 boards since our year-end 2015 open SBC roundup (without survey) that included 64 hacker boards. This expanded from 53 boards in our May 2015 SBC survey, for which winners were announced in June 2015. In our first reader survey in May 2014, readers selected from a list of 32.

The listed prices are the lowest we saw at publication, but the pricing on many of these boards is fairly fluid. Typically, the prices do not include free shipping, or if so, only to certain regions. Sometimes the shipping prices can be considerable, turning a $35 board, for example, into a $50 board. Since LinuxGizmos has an international audience, we did not factor in shipping.

 

The 2016 Hacker SBC Survey has concluded, but the real fun is just beginning!
 
Click here for the survey’s detailed results, including charts and analysis:
2016 Hacker SBC Survey Results
 
Click here for a PDF table comparing the specs of all 81 hacker SBCs:
2016 Hacker SBCs Comparison Table

 
Summaries of SBC specs

The following summaries are listed in alpha order, and are based on specs and lowest available pricing recorded in late May.

 

86Duino Zero

DM&P’s x86 architecture 86Duino boards feature Arduino-compatible expansion, low power consumption, and a modular COM+baseboard approach. The Zero provides an Fast Ethernet (10/100) port, USB 2.0 port, and microSD slot. You also get 17x digital I/O pins and 6x analog inputs, among other onboard interfaces. A $69 One model is similar, but adds HD audio and more expansion I/O. There’s also an EduCake mini-PC version. SeeedStudio sells a version of the One for $79.

 

A20-OlinuXino-Lime

  • Company/project — Olimex, OlinuXino, Mouser
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $37 (33 Euros)

We’ve dropped the aging, single-core Cortex-A8 A20-OlinuXino-Lime from our list in favor of the dual-core, Cortex-A7 A20-OlinuXino-Lime, which is only three Euros more. (See also the newer, pricier Lime2 and Micro models listed below.) The 84 x 60mm A20-OlinuXino-Lime is notable for offering a SATA interface, a rarity on low-cost ARM hacker boards enabled by the underlying Allwinner A20 SoC. Other features include microSD, Ethernet, HDMI, and three USB ports, two of them host and one OTG. You also get an LCD interface, with optional displays, as well as battery support and 160 GPIOs. An enclosure is optional.

 

A20-OlinuXino-Lime2-EMMC

  • Company/project — Olimex, OlinuXino, Mouser
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $61 (55 Euros)

The A20-OlinuXino-Lime2-EMMC essentially replaces the 4GB version of the similarly priced Lime2, swapping out the previous 4GB of NAND flash for 4GB of faster eMMC. A 2GB A20-OLinuXIno-Lime2 with NAND goes for 45 Euros ($50). All the Lime2 boards are marked by their doubling of RAM to 1GB compared to the original Lime models. They also upgrade to Gigabit Ethernet (GbE). Otherwise, the boards are essentially the same as the first-gen Limes, including the 84 x 60mm footprint. Key features include microSD, HDMI, an LCD interface, three USB ports, battery support, and 160 GPIOs. Android and Debian images are available for download.

 

A20-OlinuXino-Micro

  • Company/project — Olimex, OlinuXino, Mouser
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; optional 4GB NAND flash
  • Price — $61 (55 Euros)

The A20-OlinuXino-Micro has all the I/O of the first-gen Lime models, and doubles the RAM to 1GB. It also adds VGA, LCD with touch support, audio I/O, and expansion connectors with optional I/O modules. A promised quad-core, Cortex-A7 A33-OLinuXino board seems to have fallen by the wayside. However, a 50 x 50mm H3-OLinuXino-NANO is in the works that combines a quad-core Allwinner H3 with 512MB DDR3, Ethernet, HDMI, microSD, dual USB, USB OTG, and dual optional 40-pin connectors.

 

Andromeda Box Edge

  • Company/project — Marvell
  • Product page
  • Processor — Marvell IAP140 (4x Cortex-A53 cores @ 1.2GHz); Vivante GC7000UL GPU
  • Memory — 1GB LPDDR3 RAM; 8GB eMMC
  • Price — $75

Marvell’s 85 x 54mm, 96Boards-compatible SBC runs the Android-based Brillo OS on Marvell’s IAP140 SoC (PXA1908). The Andromeda Box community site is now operational, with full docs, schematics, and a Brillo image. The Edge adopts the 96Board CE design’s 40- and 60-pin connectors, and supports Google’s Weave and Thread networking standards. It offers WiFi, Bluetooth, three USB ports, an HDMI port, and a microSD slot. An Andromeda Box Connect version for IoT gateways is still listed as “coming soon,” along with some Andromeda Box Node devices for IoT endpoints. The Connect runs on the same Marvell Armada 385 dual-core Cortex A9 SoC that debuted on SolidRun’s ClearFog Pro. A second shopping page for the Andromeda Box Edge can be found on SolidRun’s website.

 

Arduino Industrial 101

  • Company/project — Arduino Srl
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 (1x MIPS24k @ up to 400MHz)
  • Memory — 64MB DDR2 RAM; 16MB SPI flash
  • Price — $39 (35 Euros)

This sandwich-style board splits off the Linux/WiFi capability of the discontinued Arduino Yún as a COM that is integrated into a baseboard with Arduino circuitry. The board incorporates a soldered down Linino Chiwawa LGA module that runs Linino (a version of OpenWrt) on an AR9331 WiFi SoC, accompanied by 64MB DDR2 RAM and 16MB SPI flash. The carrier board adds a 16MHz ATmega32u4 MPU along with 2.5KB SRAM and 32KB flash. There’s also a USB OTG port and 20x DIO pins that include UARTs, 7x PWMs, Ethernet, and 12x analog inputs.

 

Arduino Yún Mini

  • Company/project — Arduino Srl
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 (1x MIPS24k @ up to 400MHz)
  • Memory — 64MB DDR2 RAM
  • Price — $60 (61.60 Euros)

This update to the original Yún is offered only by Arduino Srl (Arduino.org), which broke off from Arduino LLC in early 2015. Like the original Yún, the Yún Mini runs the OpenWrt based Linino on Qualcomm’s 400MHz AR9331 SoC, and runs Arduino code on an Atmel Atmega32U4 chip. The Yún Mini is smaller (71.1 x 22.9mm), lighter (16 grams) and cheaper than the original, in part by removing the Ethernet, USB, and microSD connections. Instead these and other interfaces are available via optional “dog” accessories. Meanwhile, Arduino LLC recently announced a $50 Arduino Yún Shield, which brings a Linux-driven Yún experience to any Arduino board. It runs OpenWrt instead of Linino.

 

Arduino Tian

  • Company/project — Arduino Srl
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Qualcomm Atheros AR9432 (1x MIPS24k @ up to 560MHz); Atmel SAMD21G18 Cortex M0+ MCU (48MHz)
  • Memory — 64MB DDR2 RAM; 256KB for SAMD21G18
  • Price — $99 (87 Euros)

Compared to the Yún Mini and Arduino Industrial 101, the Tian runs Linino on a faster Atheros AR9432 WiFi SoC, and provides a faster, 32-bit Atmel MCU for Arduino duty. In addition to providing WiFi, the Tian adds a Qualcomm CSR8510 chip for Bluetooth EDR/BLE 4.0a support. Other features include an Ethernet port, a micro-USB port, 20x DIO pins, 12x PWMs, and 6x analog pins.

 

Arndale Octa

  • Company/project –, InSignal, Pyrustek
  • Product page
  • Processor — Samsung Exynos 5420 Octa (4x Cortex-A15 @ 1.8GHz and 4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.3GHz); Mali T628 MP6 GPU
  • Memory — 3GB LPDDR3e RAM
  • Price — $199

ArndaleBoard.org’s Octa board sports Samsung’s Exynos 5420 SoC, and offers generous helpings of display (HDMI, eDP, and MIPI DSI) and USB connections. There’s also MIPI-CSI camera support and an optional wireless module. A newer, $259 ArndaleBoard-K with a dual-core version of the Exynos 5420 exceeds our $200 limit.

 

Banana Pi M2

  • Company/project — SinoVoip
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A31 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); PowerVR SGX544MP2 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $58

In 2014, the Banana Pi project split between SinoVoip and LeMaker (BananaPi.org) factions, with the latter offering the dual-core Banana Pro (see below). As with many Allwinner-based SBC projects, SinoVoip’s open source support is somewhat shaky. For Linux, you’ll get better performance from images at Armbian.org. Just as the original dual-core Banana Pi was a near clone of the RPi Model B, SinoVoip’s Banana Pi M2 closely resembles the Model B+, complete with a 40-pin connector. The M2 features GbE, WiFi, five USB ports, and a range of display and camera interfaces.

 

Banana Pi M2+

  • Company/project — SinoVoip
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner H3 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.6GHz); ARM Mali-400 MP2 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $37

Despite the similar name, the new Banana Pi M2+ is not just an update of the Banana Pi M2. The M2+ has a faster Allwinner H3 SoC, but is smaller (65 x 65mm) and has fewer coastline ports. Like the M2, it has 1GB DDR3, GbE and WiFi connections, and it also adds Bluetooth and 8GB eMMC. There’s an HDMI port, MIPI-CSI camera port, dual USB 2.0 ports, and an RPi-compatible 40-pin connector.

 

Banana Pi M3

  • Company/project — SinoVoip
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A83T (8x Cortex-A7 @ 1.8GHz); PowerVR SGX544MP1 GPU
  • Memory — 2GB LPDDR3 RAM
  • Price — $70

SinoVoip’s Banana Pi M3 (BPI-M3), which dropped a bit in price since December, moves up to Allwinner’s octa-core A83T SoC, and offers double the RAM of the other Banana Pi models, as well as 8GB of eMMC flash. It’s similar in size (92 x 60mm), layout, and features to the M2, as well as the Raspberry Pi 2, and offers the same 40-pin connector. Like the M2, the M3 offers GbE, WiFi, and multiple display and camera options. It adds a SATA connection, but subtracts two of the USB ports.

 

Banana Pro

  • Company/project — LeMaker
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU
  • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $48

Compared to the rival Banana Pi M2 from former partner SinoVoip, LeMaker’s own Banana Pi update sticks closer to the original, retaining the dual-core A20 SoC. It expands to a Raspberry Pi Model B+-like 40-pin connector, switches the SD slot to microSD, and adds WiFi and a micro-USB OTG port. Unlike the M2, it provides a SATA connector, but it only has two USB host ports compared to the M2’s four. LeMaker has also launched a LeMaker Guitar SBC, as well as a cheaper version of the 96Boards-compatible HiKey board (see farther below).

 

BeagleBone Black, Rev C

  • Company/project — Beagleboard.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — TI Sitara AM3358 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz) with PRU MCU chips; PowerVR SGX530 GPU
  • Memory — 512MB RAM; 4GB eMMC
  • Price — $48

The Debian-ready BeagleBone Black Rev C came in second in both our 2014 and 2015 surveys, in large part due to the extensive Beagleboard.org community and ecosystem. This industrial-oriented SBC is mediocre at media, but it stands out with its numerous expansion interfaces and programmable “PRU” MCUs. Over the last year it has spawned a number of Beagleboard.org authorized clones. In addition to the two SeeedStudio models listed below, these include Element14’s new BeagleBone Black Industrial 4G, which is identical to the BB Black except for its conformal coating and -20 to 85°C support. There’s also a BeagleBone Blue collaboration with UCSD Robotics Lab that adds a robotics cape to a BB Black, expected this summer. SanCloud’s dual-USB BeagleBone Enhanced is due to ship to Indiegogo backers in September.

 

BeagleBone Green

  • Company/project — SeeedStudio with Beagleboard.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — TI Sitara AM3358 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz) with PRU MCU chips; PowerVR SGX530 GPU
  • Memory — 512MB RAM; 4GB eMMC
  • Price — $39

SeeedStudio’s IoT-focused re-spin of the BeagleBone Black was developed with the blessing of BeagleBoard.org, and is supported by the same robust development community. The BB Green loses the BB Black’s underused micro-HDMI port and 5V barrel jack connector. However, it costs less and adds expansion connectors for SeeedStudio’s Grove sensors. It also replaces the mini-USB connector with a micro-USB port.

 

BeagleBone Green Wireless

  • Company/project — SeeedStudio with Beagleboard.org
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — TI Sitara AM3358 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz) with PRU MCU chips; PowerVR SGX530 GPU
  • Memory — 512MB RAM; 4GB eMMC
  • Price — $45

The new BeagleBone Green Wireless is the same as the BB Green, with identical additions and subtractions from the BB Black, including the addition of a Grove interface. It also adds a TI WiLink8 module with Bluetooth, as well as 2.4GHz 802.11a/b/g/n with 2×2 MIMO and two antenna connectors. The Wireless model also adds three more USB host ports for a total of four, making it the USB leader among all the currently announced BB Black clones.

 

Bubblegum-96

  • Company/project — uCRobotics
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Actions Semiconductor Actions S900 (4x Cortex-A53 @ 1.8GHz); PowerVR G6230 GPU @ 600MHz
  • Memory — 2GB LPDDR3 RAM; 8GB eMMC
  • Price — $89

Based on an earlier ActDuino S900 prototype, the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 adopts Linaro’s 96Boards CE spec, joining the HiKey and DragonBoard 410c. With its 1.8GHz, quad-core Cortex-A53 SoC, it follows in the 96Boards tradition of using 64-bit ARMv8 chips, although it’s not a requisite of the spec. The Bubblegum-96 lacks the $75 DragonBoard 410’s GPS chip, but has a faster SoC and twice the RAM at 2GB. Its PowerVR G6230 GPU is more powerful than the Snapdragon 410’s Adreno 306 GPU. Aside from the 96Boards 40- and 60-pin expansion connectors, the Bubblegum-96 provides an HDMI port, microSD slot, a micro-USB port, and dual USB host ports, one of which is USB 3.0. WiFi and Bluetooth are also onboard

 

Chip

  • Company/project — Next Thing Co.
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner R8 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM; 4GB flash
  • Price — $9 ($19 with VGA adapter)

Before the $5 Raspberry Pi Zero, our collective minds were blown away by the $9 Chip. The 60 x 40mm Chip SBC shipped to Kickstarter backers who spent $2 million on the project. You can order the Chip now at the same price with shipments due in June 2016. The Chip runs Debian on an Allwinner R8 with a single, 1GHz Cortex-A8 core. Base features includes WiFi, BT, and USB and AV ports. Add-on boards required to make the Chip a plug-and-play solution include VGA ($19) and HDMI ($24) adapters. Also available is the $49, Chip-based PocketChip handheld with a 4.3-inch touchscreen and keyboard.

CloudBit

  • Company/project — LittleBits Electronics
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — NXP i.MX233 (1x ARM9 @ 454MHz)
  • Memory — 64MB RAM; 4GB microSD card
  • Price — $60

In 2014, the popular, Arduino-oriented LittleBits maker platform added its first Linux SBC with the ARM9-based CloudBit. The tiny (15 x 10mm) board integrates WiFi, a power-only micro-USB port, and dual “BitSnap” connectors for adding standard LittleBits modules, six of which are provided in a $90 bundle. The Arch Linux based platform connects to a Node.js-oriented cloud platform designed for monitoring IoT gizmos, and supports IFTTT IF-THEN scripting.

 

Creator Ci40

  • Company/project — Imagination Technologies
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Imagination cXT200 (2x MIPS InterAptiv @ 550MHz)
  • Memory — 256MB DDR3 RAM; 512MB flash
  • Price — $156 for full IoT kit

Imagination’s IoT-focused follow-on to the Creator Ci20 appears to have shipped to Kickstarter backers, and is now available for pre-order. It’s currently only available in the $156 kit, which includes several MikroBus Clicker wireless modules and Click daughterboards, both from MikroElektronika. The Ci40 tosses out the Ci20’s more powerful Ingenic XBurst chip for a slower, more power efficient MIPS InterAptiv chip that lacks a GPU: the Imagination cXT200. Other major changes include better wireless support, and the new MikroBus and Raspberry Pi expansion interfaces. A FlowCloud API is available for cloud-based IoT device management.

 

Cubieboard3 (CubieTruck)

  • Company/project — Cubieboard.org, Wang and Tom Development, Ltd.
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
  • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM; optional NAND or TSD flash
  • Price — $86

With the arrival of the Cubieboard4, this third-generation model dropped to $75. (We stripped the aging CubieBoard2 from our list, but it’s still available for $59.) The CubieBoard3 does everything the Cubieboard2 does, and more. The $86 model offers 2GB of RAM, WiFi and Bluetooth, plus GbE, VGA, and SPDIF ports. It has fewer expansion pins (54) and lacks standard flash, but you can choose between dual microSD slots, or a mix of microSD and onboard flash.

 

Cubieboard4

  • Company/project — Cubieboard.org, Wang and Tom Development, Ltd.
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner A80 (4x Cortex-A15 @ up to 2GHz, 4x Cortex-A7 @ up to 1.3GHz); PowerVR G6230 GPU
  • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM; 8GB eMMC, expandable to 64GB
  • Price — $125

The Cubieboard4 runs Android or Linux on an octa-core Allwinner A80 SoC, which is paired with a 64-core PowerVR G6230 GPU. The 111 x 111mm SBC offers generous storage expansion, plus VGA and HDMI ports, four USB 2.0 ports, a USB 3.0 port, WiFi, Bluetooth, and Gigabit Ethernet. There’s also a 54-pin expansion connector.

 

Cubieboard5 (CubieTruck-Plus)

  • Company/project — Cubieboard.org, Wang and Tom Development, Ltd.
  • Product page
  • Processor — Allwinner H8 (8x Cortex-A7 @ up to 2GHz); PowerVR SGX544 GPU @ up to 700MHz
  • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM
  • Price — $99

Like LinkSprite’s pcDuino8 Uno, the CubieBoard5 advances to an Allwinner H8 with eight Cortex-A7 cores. Launched in March, the SBC provides microSD and SATA storage expansion, with an optional RAID add-on board. For connectivity, you get WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, and a GbE port. Dual display support is available via the HDMI and DisplayPorts. You also get a pair of USB host ports, plus an IR sensor, S/PDIF audio, and an optional lithium battery.

 

DPT-Board

  • Company/project — DPTechnics
  • LinuxGizmos coverage
  • Product page
  • Processor — Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 (1x MIPS24k @ up to 400MHz)
  • Memory — 64MB DDR2 RAM
  • Price — $56 ($65 for Plus version)

The DPT-Board is a sandwich-style SBC that integrates a separately available DPT-Module COM with an Atheros AR9331 chip running OpenWrt. For 50 Euros, you get a power-sipping IoT board with WiFi, GPIO, and JTAG plus dual 10/100 Ethernet ports and dual USB ports. A 58.42-Euro Plus version adds more interfaces, and there’s a 99-Euro IoT kit that combines the SBC with a mini-LCD, breadboard, a 9g micro server, and distance, temperature, and proximity/line sensors. The kit also includes jumper wires, resistors, and buttons. All the boards ship with BlueCherry.io IoT connectivity software.

 

DragonBoard 410c
  • Company/project — Qualcomm, Arrow

    Built by Arrow Electronics, Qualcomm’s 96Boards CE compliant DragonBoard 410c was one of the first 64-bit ARM hacker SBCs. The DragonBoard 410c showcases Qualcomm’s quad-core, Cortex-A53 Snapdragon 410 SoC. At 85 x 54mm, the SBC is about the same size as the Raspberry Pi, but offers 96Boards-compliant, 40-pin low-speed and 60-pin high-speed connectors. There’s no Ethernet port, but you get WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, HDMI, microSD, and three USB ports. The SBC supports Android 5.1, Debian 8.0, and Windows 10 IoT Core. According to CNXSoft, Arrow and Qualcomm are prepping a DragonBoard 600c 96Boards CE board built around the quad-core, Cortex-A15-like Snapdragon 600.

     

    Firefly FirePrime

    • Company/project — Firefly
    • Product page
    • Processor — Rockchip RK3128 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.3GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB or 2GB LPDDR2 RAM; 8GB NAND flash (eMMC on FirePrimeS+)
    • Price — $99 (1GB) or $119 (2GB on S+)

    The Firefly’s FirePrime is a cheaper alternative to the Firefly-RK3288 (see below), as it dual boots Android and Ubuntu on a slower quad-core -A7 Rockchip, and offers half the RAM and flash. The sandwich-style, COM/baseboard device includes GbE, WiFi, Bluetooth, HDMI, MIPI-DSI, MIPI-CSI, SPDIF, analog audio, LVDS, IR, and CVBS. The 117 x 85mm boardset offers four USB host ports, a micro-USB OTG port, and dual 42-pin expansion connectors. A FirePrimeS+ SBC appears to be identical except that it doubles RAM to 2GB and switches from NAND to eMMC flash.

     

    Firefly-RK3288

    • Company/project — Firefly
    • Product page
    • Processor — Rockchip RK3288 (4x Cortex-A17 @ 1.8GHz); Mali-T760 GPU
    • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM with 16GB eMMC (4GB DDR3 RAM and 32GB eMMC on Plus model)
    • Price — $159 ($229 for Plus)

    The Firefly-RK3288 dual boots Ubuntu and Android on a 1.8GHz, quad-core Cortex-A17 SoC. The 118 x 85mm board’s HDMI 2.0 port can output up to [email protected] video, says Firefly, a spinoff of T-Chip Technology Co. The board offers dual-band 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.0, a GbE port, and three USB ports. The SBC is further equipped with VGA, LVDS, eDP, MIPI-DSI, MIPI-CSI, SPDIF, serial debug, and IR connections. Additional I/O is available via dual 42-pin connectors. A “Plus” version doubles the RAM and flash.

     

    Firefly-RK3288 Reload

    • Company/project — Firefly
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Rockchip RK3288 (4x Cortex-A17 @ 1.8GHz); Mali-T760 GPU
    • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM; 16GB eMMC
    • Price — $189

    The Firefly-RK3288 Reload has the same processors and OS support as the Firefly-RK3288, but is recast as a sandwich-style COM-and-carrier product. The 178 x 117mm carrier connects to an 82 x 60mm COM via a 314-pin MXM connector. The Reload provides all the features of the original, and adds a second HDMI output (1.4), a new HDMI input, and a second DVP camera interface, but only for a 5-megapixel camera instead of 13MP. The Reload also adds a SATA port, a third USB host port, a micro-USB OTG port, and 100 new expansion pins, for a total of 184.

     

    Galileo Gen 2

    • Company/project — Intel
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Intel Quark X1000 (1x Pentium-compatible @ 400MHz)
    • Memory — 256MB DRAM
    • Price — $56

    The price of the Linux-ready Galileo Gen 2 dropped last year, but has since risen to a low of $56 at Arrow’s Verical subsidiary. Intel’s second-generation Galileo offers the same Quark processor, memory, and Arduino compatibility as the original, but supplies minor updates to USB, PWMs, and GPIOs. It also adds optional 12V PoE (Power-over-Ethernet) support.

     

    Gizmo 2

    • Company/project — AMD, GizmoSphere.org, SemiconductorStore.com
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — AMD G-Series GX210HA SoC (2x x86 @ 1GHz); Radeon HD 800 graphics
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 SDRAM
    • Price — $189

    AMD-backed GizmoSphere.org’s Gizmo 2 swaps out the G-Series APU found on the original Gizmo board for a faster G-Series SoC model. The SBC also adds HDMI, microSD, mSATA, and USB 3.0 ports. The Gizmo 2 ships with Timesys Embedded Linux, but supports other Linux distros, as well as Windows and Minoca OS.

     

    HiKey

    • Company/project — LeMaker
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — HiSilicon Kirin 6220 (8x Cortex-A53 @ 1.2GHz); Mali 450-MP4 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB or 2GB LPDDR3 RAM; 8GB eMMC
    • Price — $75 (1GB) or $99 (2GB)

    CircuitCo built the original Hikey, which was the flagship SBC for the Linaro-supported 96Boards SBC standard, as well as the first 64-bit ARM hacker board. Availability was sketchy, however, and it’s no longer in stock. Fortunately, there is now a cheaper version from LeMaker sold with 8GB flash. It also adds an optional 2GB of RAM, which you’ll probably want to help keep up with those eight Cortex-A53 cores on the Kirin 6220. The SBC adopts the 85 x 54mm 96Boards Consumer Edition form-factor, featuring a 40-pin low-speed GPIO connector and 60-pin high-speed connector. Features include WiFi, Bluetooth, HDMI and three USB ports. The LeMaker version replaces the earlier DisplayPort with MIPI-DSI. The Linux-oriented board recently received support from the Android Open Source Project, as promised by Linaro in March.

     

    HobbitBoard

    • Company/project — Wandboard.org
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 UltraLite (1x Cortex-A7 @ 528MHz); WXGA graphics
    • Memory — 256MB RAM; 4GB eMMC
    • Price — $69

    This IoT-oriented, sandwich-style board-set is Wandboard.org’s first new product in years. It runs Google’s lightweight, Android-based Brillo OS on a 528MHz i.MX6 UltraLite housed on a Technexion-built COM that closely resembles the company’s commercial PICO-IMX6UL module. The HobbitBoard offers WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0, as well as Ethernet, dual USB ports, an audio jack, and a PMIC. The COM can be removed and plugged into the 70-pin Hirose socket on an Intel Edison carrier board. When connected to the 100 x 45mm HobbitBoard carrier, the Edison connector remains active. The board also offers a MikroBus socket for Click add-on modules, as well as four board-to-board expansion headers that are identical to those found on the Wandboard. The HobbitBoard is delayed, but it’s up for pre-orders for a low of $69 at ARMkits, with availability in the coming weeks.

     

    HummingBoard-Base

    • Company/project — SolidRun
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Solo, DualLite, Dual, or Quad (1x, 2x, 2x, or 4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1.2GHz); Vivante 2D/3D GPU
    • Memory — Solo (512MB), DualLite and Dual (1GB), and Quad (2GB) DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $70 to $130

    In launching its high-end HummingBoard-Edge SBC last July, SolidRun reorganized its multi-tier HummingBoard product line into HummingBoard-Base and -Pro editions. These sandwich-style boards are the same as the earlier i1 and i2/i2eX models, except each joins the HummingBoard-Edge in supporting a choice of MicroSOMs based on i.MX6 Solo, DualLite, Dual, and Quad SoCs. The 86 x 55mm boards offer Pi-like ports and layout, as well as a 26-pin connector that is similar to those used on the first-gen Pi models. Both models offer dual USB 2.0 ports, as well as HDMI, MIPI-CSI, and SPDIF audio. As with the other HummingBoard models, the GbE port is limited to 470Mbps due to i.MX6 thresholds.

     

    HummingBoard-Pro

    • Company/project — SolidRun
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Solo, DualLite, Dual, or Quad (1x, 2x, 2x, or 4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1.2GHz); Vivante 2D/3D GPU
    • Memory — Solo (512MB), DualLite and Dual (1GB), and Quad (2GB) DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $85 to $210 (Pro)

    The HummingBoard-Pro is identical to the HummingBoard-Base, except that it adds mini-PCIe, mSATA, LVDS, analog audio, RTC, and IR. It also offers two more internal USB headers. Options on both models include microSD slots, a wireless module, a power adapter, and a custom enclosure.

     

    HummingBoard-Edge

    • Company/project — SolidRun
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Solo, DualLite, Dual, or Quad (1x, 2x, 2x, or 4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1.2GHz); Vivante 2D/3D GPU
    • Memory — Solo (512MB), DualLite and Dual (1GB), and Quad (2GB or 4GB) DDR3 RAM; 4GB eMMC
    • Price — $102 to $252

    The HummingBoard-Edge is larger (102 x 69mm) than the HummingBoard-Pro, and doubles the USB 2.0 count to four, while adding optional onboard eMMC. It has all the other Pro features, and adds an M.2 slot, a SIM slot, and a MIPI-DSI connector. Other additions include a larger 36-pin GPIO connector and a wide-range 7-36V power supply. As with the Pro, SolidRun offers numerous options including wireless modules, and in the case of the Quad model, which exceeds our $200 limit in the higher configurations, 4GB of RAM.

     

    HummingBoard-Gate

    • Company/project — SolidRun
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Solo, DualLite, Dual, or Quad (1x, 2x, 2x, or 4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1.2GHz); Vivante 2D/3D GPU
    • Memory — Solo (512MB), DualLite and Dual (1GB), and Quad (2GB or 4GB) DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $70 to $235

    As the name suggests, the HummingBoard-Gate is designed primarily for IoT gateway duty. The SBC lacks HummingBoard-Edge features like LVDS, analog audio, or eMMC and M.2 storage. Otherwise, it’s almost identical, with the same 102 x 69mm footprint, wide-range 7-36V power supply, mini-PCIe, and optional wireless modules and metal enclosure. Its major new offering is a MikroBus socket that accepts MikroElektronika’s 200-plus Click add-on modules, offering I/O, wireless, sensors, transceivers, displays, encoders, and pushbutton modules.

     

    Inforce 6410Plus

    • Company/project — Inforce Computing
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 (4x “Krait” cores clocked at 1.7GHz); Adreno 320 GPU; QDSP6V4 DSP
    • Memory — 2GB PCDDR3 RAM; 4GB eMMC
    • Price — $143

    Voted as the most requested board among those we omitted in our May 2015 survey, the Inforce 6410Plus is aimed primarily at the commercial market, but is an open platform that has attracted the maker market. The Plus model that arrived last June updates the original, bringing new robotics and IoT focused features like GPS, MIPI-CSI, MIPI-DSI, a beefier 12V power supply, a slimmer, 16mm profile, and a new 34-pin PAC expansion header. The 100 x 70mm Pico-ITX board continues to run Linux or Android on the quad-core, Cortex-A15-like Snapdragon 600. Inforce has replaced LVDS with dual MIPI-DSI interfaces that join the pre-existing micro-HDMI port. Other features include GbE, microSD, SATA, WiFi, BT, and three USB ports, including an OTG port.

     

    Intel Edison Kit for Arduino

    • Company/project — Intel
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Intel Atom “Tangier” (2x x86 @ 500MHz); Quark coprocessor
    • Memory — 1GB LPDDR3 RAM; 4GB eMMC
    • Price — $87

    The Intel Edison is a COM, not an SBC, but it’s also sold as part of a sandwich-style SBC called the Edison Kit for Arduino. Arduino extensions are also found in many of the specialized Edison hacker kits available from third parties like SeeedStudio (Grove sensors) and DSF Robot. Intel’s Edison Kit for Arduino goes for $87.17 on Eduporium, but costs $110 at Adafruit. The 35.5 x 25mm Edison module mounted on the board runs a Yocto Project Linux build on a 22nm Intel Atom that has been stripped of its HD graphics. The full kit offers WiFi, Bluetooth LE, a microSD slot, and dual micro-USB ports. Other I/O includes an Arduino connector and a 70-pin header that has been adopted by third party boards.

     

    LeMaker Guitar

    • Company/project — LeMaker
    • Product page
    • Processor — Actions S500 (4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1.6GHz); PowerVR SGX544 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB or 2GB DDR3 RAM; 8GB eMMC
    • Price — $45

    LeMaker has followed up its Banana Pro (see farther above) with a LeMaker branded Guitar, a sandwich-style, open-spec SBC. The COM runs Android 5.0 or Linux on a quad-core Actions S500 SoC. The baseboard (Rev.B) offers WiFi, Bluetooth, Ethernet, HDMI, micro-USB 3.0, and dual USB host ports. There’s also a MIPI-CSI camera interface and RPi-compatible 40-pin connector.

     

    LinkIt Smart 7688

    • Company/project — MediaTek Labs, SeeedStudio
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — MediaTek MT7688AN (1x MIPS core @ 580MHz); Atmel ATmega32U4 MPU (Duo only)
    • Memory — 128MB RAM; 32MB flash
      Price — $12.90 or $15.90 (Duo)

    MediaTek Labs’ tiny, SeeedStudio-built LinkIt boards run OpenWrt on a 580MHz MIPS SoC, and targets IoT endpoints and gateways. The $13 model measures 56 x 26mm, and offers WiFi, microSD, and dual micro-USB ports, and the $16, 61 x 26mm LinkIt Smart 7688 Duo adds an MPU for Arduino support. The boards provide GPIO, I2C, SPI, UART, PWM, and Fast Ethernet, plus I2S audio on the base model and ADC and SPI on the Duo. SeeedStudio offers an optional breakout board for the standard LinkIt, and provides three options for the Duo: breakouts for Arduino and Grove sensors, and a more feature-rich Grove Starter Kit. A MediaTek Cloud Sandbox service is available for IoT data collection and analytics, and a LinkIt/Grove kit can link up to Amazon’s AWS IoT cloud platform.

     

    LinkSprite Acadia V3

    • Company/project — LinkSprite Technologies
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Quad (4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1.2GHz); Vivante GC355 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DRAM
      Price — $119

    The LinkSprite Acadia runs Ubuntu or Android on an i.MX6 Quad, rather than the Allwinner SoCs typically used on LinkSprite’s pcDuino boards. Compared to the V2 model covered in the LinuxGizmos story linked to above, the V3 loses the onboard eMMC flash but provides both a microSD slot and dual SD slots. Other features include HDMI, LVDS, SATA, audio, and GbE connections, as well as three USB ports, dual cameras interfaces, and an Arduino-compatible header.

     

    LinkSprite Arches

    • Company/project — LinkSprite Technologies
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner A80 (4x Cortex-A15 @ up to 2GHz, 4x Cortex-A7 cores @ up to 1.3GHz); PowerVR G6230 GPU
    • Memory — 2GB DRAM; 8GB flash
    • Price — $95

    The LinkSprite Arches was originally unveiled as the pcDuino8 in May 2014, and then arrived in beta form later in the year, before going final in 2015. The Arches runs Linux or Android on an octa-core Allwinner A80, and is quite similar to the A80-based Cubieboard4. The SBC is equipped with microSD, HDMI, GbE, and three USB ports (one of them 3.0 OTG), as well as WiFi, Bluetooth, and a CSI camera interface.

     

    MarsBoard AM335x

    • Company/project — Haoyu Electronics, MarsBoard.com
    • Product page
    • Processor — TI Sitara AM3358 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz)
    • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM; 4GB eMMC
    • Price — $75n

    The latest MarsBoard is a BeagleBone Black clone designed for those looking for a modular, sandwich-style design. The CM-AM335 module is also available separately. The board is almost identically spec’d as the BB Black, right down to the dual 50-pin connectors, although the port layout is different.

     

    MarsBoard RK3066

    • Company/project — Haoyu Electronics, MarsBoard.com
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Rockchip RK3066 (2x Cortex-A9 @ 1.6GHz); Mali-400 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; 4GB eMMC
    • Price — $58

    The MarsBoard RK3066 is a modular, COM+baseboard SBC that runs Linux and Android on the dual-core RK3066. There are five USB ports and a 10/100 Ethernet port, along with HDMI, SPDIF, IR, and camera interfaces. An almost identical, $60 PX2 version is designed more for industrial usage, and there’s also a more feature-rich Pro model (see below).

     

    MarsBoard RK3066 Pro

    • Company/project — Haoyu Electronics, MarsBoard.com
    • Product page
    • Processor — Rockchip RK3066 (2x Cortex-A9 @ 1.6GHz); Mali-400 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; 4GB eMMC flash
    • Price — $140

    The MarsBoard RK3066 Pro has the same RK3066 SoC, memory, and modular, COM+baseboard design as the standard version, and similarly runs Linux and Android. This larger, pricier board adds more I/O, however, including an Arduino interface, a VGA port, a microSD slot, and 1-Wire, SPI, I2C, and UART interfaces. The Pro also offers the previously supplied five USB ports, 10/100 Ethernet, HDMI, LCD, SPDIF, IR, and camera interfaces.

     

    MinnowBoard Turbot

    • Company/project — Intel, ADI, MinnowBoard.org
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Intel Atom E3826 (2x x86 @ 1.46GHz); Intel HD Graphics
    • Memory — 2GB DDR3L RAM
    • Price — $140

    Built by ADI Engineering, with the support of the Intel-backed MinnowBoard.org community, the 3.9 x 2.9-inch MinnowBoard Turbot replaces the CircuitCo-built MinnowBoard Max, which is no longer in production. Whereas the Max was available with a single-core Atom E3815 or dual-core E3825, the Turbot moves to a slightly faster, dual-core Atom E3826. Otherwise, the Turbot is almost identical, except for a new RTC battery holder and other tweaks. As before, the Debian and Android 4.4 ready board includes a low-speed expansion header that provides Arduino-like prototyping I/O and supports homegrown add-on boards called Lures. Other I/O includes dual USB ports plus GbE, micro-HDMI, and SATA connections. Netgate had the best price we saw, at $140.

     

    NanoPC-T3

    • Company/project — FriendlyARM
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Samsung S5P6818 (8x Cortex-A53 @ 400MHz to 1.4GHz); Mali-400 MP GPU
    • Memory — 1GB or 2GB DDR3 RAM; 8GB eMMC
    • Price — $60

    Equipped with an octa-core Samsung S5P6818, the 100 x 60mm NanoPC-T3 SBC is almost identical to the earlier, quad-core NanoPC-T2, which is now available for $44. In addition to the faster processor, the T3 also adds a 2GB RAM option. Other features common to both NanoPC boards include an SD slot, a GbE port, plus WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0. The boards also provide four USB host ports, and a micro-USB client port. Media ports include HDMI, LVDS, LCD, MIPI-DSI, MIPI-CSI, audio, and other extras. In place of the 40-pin Pi connector found on the NanoPi boards, the NanoPC-T3 has 30-pin GPIO expansion.

     

    NanoPi M1

    • Company/project — FriendlyARM
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner H3 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.2GHz); ARM Mali-400 MP2 GPU
    • Memory — 512MB or 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $11 or $16 (1GB)

    While most of FriendlyARM’s open-spec SBCs run on Samsung SoCs, the $11 NanoPi M1 adopts a quad-core Allwinner H3. The 69 × 48mm SBC takes aim at the $10, H3-based Orange Pi One. It offers more expensive $10 shipping to the U.S. but adds a number of features missing from the Orange Pi One. These include a CVBS A/V output, an IR receiver, a mic, and two more USB 2.0 host ports for a total of three. Standard features shared by both include microSD, Fast Ethernet, HDMI, DVP camera, and a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector. Images are available for Ubuntu MATE and Ubuntu Snappy Core.

     

    NanoPi M2

    • Company/project — FriendlyARM
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Samsung S5P4418 (4x Cortex-A9 @ 400MHz to 1.4GHz); 3D GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $25

    The NanoPi M2 SBC was announced in early March, several weeks before the cheaper M1 model detailed above. The 64 x 56mm SBC uses a quad-core Samsung S5P4418 SoC instead of an Allwinner H3, and advances from 10/100 to 10/100/1000 Ethernet. There are only two coastline USB host ports instead of three, although two more host ports are available via headers. There’s also a micro-USB client port. Other I/O includes, HDMI, LCD, DVP camera, microSD, and audio. The NanoPi-M2 is further equipped with a mic, PMIC, RTC pins, a debug interface, and a 40-pin Pi-compatible interface.

     

    NanoPi M3

    • Company/project — FriendlyARM
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Samsung S5P6818 (8x Cortex-A53 @ 400MHz to 1.4GHz); Mali-400MP GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $35

    The NanoPi M3 appears to be the current price leader among the relatively few octa-core hacker SBCs. The 64 x 60mm SBC is available with Debian and Android images to run on its Samsung S5P6818 SoC. WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 are onboard along with a GbE port. Multimedia interfaces include HDMI, LCD, LVDS, DVP camera, and audio. The SBC is further equipped with dual USB 2.0 host ports and two more USB headers, plus a micro-USB client port. A 40-pin, RPi-compatible header is also available. Too bad there is no 2GB RAM option to keep up with that 64-bit octa-core.

     

    NanoPi2 Fire

    • Company/project — FriendlyARM
    • Product page
    • Processor — Samsung S5P4418 (4x Cortex-A9 @ 400MHz to 1.4GHz); 3D GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $23

    The NanoPi2 Fire replaces the earlier NanoPi2 SBC by swapping out the onboard wireless module for a Gigabit Ethernet port, and adding a power management IC. It similarly runs Android or Debian on a quad-core S5P4418 SoC, which is also used by the very similarly configured NanoPi M2. (We wonder why FriendlyARM launched two such similar boards in quick succession.) The 75 x 40mm SBC offers both an HDMI port and an LCD interface, and supplies a DVP connection for a camera. Other features include a microSD slot, a 40-pin, Pi-compatible connector, a micro-USB OTG port, and a USB host port — one less than the M2.

     

    Odroid-C0

    • Company/project — Hardkernel, Odroid project
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Amlogic S805 (4x Cortex-A5 @ 1.5GHz); Mali-450 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; optional eMMC 4.5
    • Price — $26.80 (with $1.80 Connector Pack)

    Aimed at IoT and robotics applications, the Odroid-C0 is a smaller (65 x 56mm) somewhat stripped down version of the Odroid C and C+ (see below). It has the same quad-core SoC, but HDMI is the only coastline port. An optional Connector Pack lets you solder on real-world connections for onboard, unpopulated interfaces including dual USB host, serial console, IR, I2S, and a Raspberry Pi 40-pin interface. A battery connector with charging circuit supports an optional 3.7V Li-Po battery. Internet connectivity requires an optional WiFi dongle.

     

    Odroid-C1+

    • Company/project — Hardkernel, Odroid project
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Amlogic S805 (4x Cortex-A5 @ 1.5GHz); Mali-450 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $32

    The Odroid-C1+ upgrades the Odroid-C1, which came in fourth place in our 2015 SBC reader survey. With the arrival of the similar, but 64-bit Odroid-C2, the C1+ has dropped to $32. The C1+ converts the HDMI port from micro to full-size, offers the heatsink as standard issue, and adds an I2S audio interface, USB-OTG power, and a CEC function that is independent of RTC. Otherwise it’s the same as the C1, with an Android- and Ubuntu-ready quad-core Cortex-A5 SoC, microSD or eMMC storage expansion, a GbE port, and four USB host ports. The 85 x 56mm SBC also features a RPi-compatible 40-pin connector.

     

    Odroid-C2

    • Company/project — Hardkernel, Odroid project
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Amlogic S905 (4x Cortex-53 @ up to 1.5GHz); Mali-450 MP2 GPU
    • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM; optional 8GB eMMC
    • Price — $40

    The Odroid-C2 has the same 85 x 56mm size and layout as the Odroid-C1+, but advances to a quad-core, Cortex-A53 Amlogic S905 SoC. It matches or exceeds the specs of the Raspberry Pi 3, which came out a month later. The C2 doubles the RAM of the C1+ to 2GB, and offers a choice between up to 64GB of eMMC and an 8GB or 16GB SD 3.01 compatible UHS-1 microSD card that is touted for its speed. The Odroid-C2 can output 4k/60Hz video with 3840 x 2160-pixel resolution — barely — and the Odroid project is working on firmware improvements to enhance rendering performance. Otherwise, the C2 has almost everything the C1+ has, including GbE and HDMI ports, four USB host ports, and a 40-pin RPi connector. Other S905-based hacker boards include an upcoming SBC from VideoStrong .

     

    Odroid-XU4

    • Company/project — Hardkernel, Odroid project
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Samsung Exynos5422 (4x Cortex-A15 @ 2.0GHz and 4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.4GHz); Mali-T628 MP6 GPU
    • Memory — 2GB LPDDR3 RAM
    • Price — $74

    The Odroid-XU4 replaced the Odroid-XU3, which came in sixth place in our 2015 survey, and was discontinued along with the Odroid-U3. The XU4 has the same octa-core Exynos5422 and Mali-T628 GPU as the XU3, and although it drops a few interfaces, it’s less than half the price. Hardkernel has removed the DisplayPort, leaving only an audio-ready HDMI port. The USB 3.0 OTG port has morphed into a second USB 3.0 host port, and there’s only one USB 2.0 port instead of four. There’s no longer an audio codec, so you’re dependent on HDMI, USB, or I2S for sound. As before, there’s an option for a USB-based SATA 3 module, an I/O board, and various wireless options. The XU4 advances from 10/100 to 10/100/1000 Ethernet, and adds a 12-pin GPIO header in addition to the previous expansion connector.

     

    Orange Pi Lite

    • Company/project — Shenzhen Xunlong Software
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner H3 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.2GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU
    • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $12

    Shenzhen Xunlong now lists six Orange Pi models on its website, and seven on its shopping page. We’ve condensed this a bit, starting by tossing out the Orange Pi 2 and Mini 2, which no longer appear to be for sale. The latest Orange Pi is the fetchingly priced Orange Pi Lite, a WiFi variant of the Orange Pi One. The 69 x 48mm Lite has the 1.2GHz version of the quad-core Allwinner H3 compared to 1.6GHz on the Orange Pi PC, and it’s limited to half a gig of RAM. You do get microSD, HDMI, MIPI-CSI, dual USB host, a micro-USB OTG port, and the usual Orange Pi 40-pin RPi-compatible header. WiFi is onboard, which is a good thing since there’s no Ethernet. The $12 price and under $4 shipping would be irresistible if not for the Orange Pi project’s mixed record on firmware releases and reliability. It’s not the worst, but popularity seems to be catching up with the project. Fortunately, the Armbian community has picked up the slack by supporting the Allwinner H3 with Debian.

     

    Orange Pi One

    • Company/project — Shenzhen Xunlong Software
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner H3 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.2GHz); ARM Mali-400 MP2 GPU
    • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $10

    The outrageously affordable Orange Pi One preceded the similar $12 Lite version. The One offers 10/100 Ethernet instead of WiFi, and has only one USB host port instead of two. Otherwise, the specs are identical, including microSD, HDMI, MIPI-CSI, micro-USB OTG, and 40-pin connections. Comparing by price, performance, and features, if not support and community, it clearly beats the $5 to $25 RPi Zero or $9 to $25 Chip, but the H3-based $11 NanoPi M1 has a few more features.

     

    Orange Pi PC / PC Plus

    • Company/project — Shenzhen Xunlong Software
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner H3 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.6GHz); ARM Mali-400 MP2 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; 8GB eMMC on PC Plus
    • Price — $15 ($20 for PC Plus)

    The $15 Orange Pi PC has an Allwinner H3, a Raspberry Pi-like 85 x 55mm footprint, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion. It has twice the RAM of the Lite and One models, and provides microSD, HDMI, CVBS, CSI, USB OTG, and 10/100 Ethernet connections. A new Orange Pi PC Plus model adds 8GB of eMMC flash.

     

    Orange Pi Plus2 / Plus 2E

    • Company/project — Shenzhen Xunlong Software
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner H3 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.6GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU
    • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM; 8GB eMMC
    • Price — $49 ($39 for Plus2E)

    Like the Orange Pi 2 and the still available, $39 Orange Pi Plus1, the Orange Pi Plus2 and new Plus2E run distributions such as Lubuntu, Raspbian, and Android on a quad-core, 1.6GHz Allwinner H3. Compared to the Plus1, the Plus2 doubles the RAM to 2GB and expands slightly to 108 × 67mm. Other features appear to be identical, including an RPi-compatible 40-pin connector, four USB host ports, plus micro-USB, microSD, SATA, HDMI, CVBS, and CSI interfaces. Both WiFi and GbE connections are standard. The Orange Pi Plus2E swaps the four-port USB hub for three separate USB ports, and loses the SATA connection, but shaves $10 off the price.

     

    Parallella

    • Company/project — Adapteva, Parallella.org
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Xilinx Zynq-7020 or -7010 SoC (2x Cortex-A9 @ 667MHz plus FPGA); 16-core Epiphany RISC chip
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $99

    Aimed at power-efficient server clustering applications and parallel programming research, the Parallella features a Zynq ARM/FPGA SoC running Ubuntu, plus a homegrown 16-core Epiphany coprocessor. I/O includes microSD, gigabit Ethernet, micro-HDMI, and dual USB ports. Four 60-pin connectors provide for Epiphany and FPGA extensions. Adapteva also offers a $75 Micro-Server version with a Zynq-7010 that omits the USB, HDMI, and expansion I/O. In April, a major new SDK release arrived with stock versions of Ubuntu/Linaro 15.04 and Linux kernel 4.4.

     

    pcDuino Lite / Lite WiFi

    • Company/project — LinkSprite Technologies
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner A10 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
    • Memory — 512MB (Lite) or 256MB (Lite WiFi); no flash (Lite) or 2GB flash (Lite WiFi)
    • Price — $29 each

    LinkSprite’s Ubuntu- and Android-ready pcDuino Lite and pcDuino Lite WiFi hold down the low end of the pcDuino product line, combining the Cortex-A8 based Allwinner A10 with Arduino-style expansion and HDMI ports. The Lite WiFi version replaces the Lite’s Fast Ethernet connection with WiFi. It also has half the RAM at 256MB, but unlike the Lite, it provides 2GB of flash. The WiFi version is also slightly smaller at 100 x 52mm.

     

    pcDuino3Nano / Nano Lite

    • Company/project — LinkSprite Technologies
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner A20 (2x Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz); Mali-400 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DRAM; 4GB flash (except for Lite)
    • Price — $40 ($35 for Lite)

    The 92.2 x 54.1mm pcDuino3Nano offers most of the features of the larger, $49 pcDuino3, including Arduino expansion and Ubuntu and Android support. The Nano lacks the 3’s WiFi, LVDS, and I2S digital audio connections. For $5 less, the pcDuino3Nano Lite omits the standard version’s 4GB flash and IR connection. Standard features on both include microSD, HDMI, GbE, MIPI-CSI, audio, and SATA ports, as well as two USB host ports and an OTG port. LinkSprite also continues to sell a larger, A20-based pcDuino2 board, as well as a pcDuino3B that is identical to the pcDuino3 except it changes from Fast to Gigabit Ethernet.

     

    pcDuino8 Uno

    • Company/project — LinkSprite Technologies
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner H8 (8x Cortex-A7 @ 2GHz); Power VR SGX544 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DRAM
    • Price — $49

    The pcDuino 8 Uno touched down last fall with an octa-core Allwinner H8 clocked to 2GHz, combined with the usual pcDuino Arduino expansion. The 3 5/8 x 2 1/8-inch board provides microSD expansion, a GbE port, USB host and OTG ports, and HDMI, audio, MIPI-CSI, and IR connections. LinkSprite also offers an Android-only PCDuino 8 STB set-top box version for the same price that ships with slightly different I/O and an enclosure. The PCDuino 8 STB is sibling to a very similar pcDuino4 STB that offers a quad-core Allwinner H3 SoC.

     

    Pine A64

    • Company/project — Pine64, Inc.
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Allwinner A64 (4x Cortex-A53 cores @ 1.2GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU
    • Memory — 512MB (standard), 1GB ($19 Plus), 2GB ($29 Plus) DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $15 to $29

    The Pine A64 attracted 36,781 Kickstarter backers last year, who generated $1,731,465 to back this incredibly cheap quad-core, 64-bit Raspberry Pi clone. Standard features include microSD, HDMI, Fast Ethernet, audio, dual USB 2.0 host, and micro-USB ports. The 127 x 79mm board offers a Pi-compatible, 40-pin connector and a 14-pin Euler connector for more I/O. There’s also an RTC and -20 to 70°C support. The $15 model ships with 512MB RAM, but we would recommend the $19 or $29 Plus models, available in 1GB and 2GB configurations, respectively. These models also boost Ethernet to GbE, and add a touchpanel interface, MIPI-DSI and MIPI-CSI ports, plus display and camera options.

     

    PixiePro

    • Company/project — Code
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Quad (4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1.0GHz); Vivante 2D/3D GPU
    • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $100

    The PixiePro, which runs Arch Linux on an i.MX6 Quad, is a wireless wizard, offering 802.11ac, Bluetooth, NFC, 3G, and GPS. Real-world ports include dual microSD slots, micro-HDMI, TOSLINK audio, micro-USB OTG, and dual USB host ports. A SATA interface is onboard, and there’s a pair of high-density, rear-mounted expansion connectors supporting GbE, PCIe, MIPI-CSI and -DSI, and various serial and industrial interfaces. Other features include accelerometers and a 0 to 85°C temperature range.

     

    Radxa Rock Lite / Rock Pro

    • Company/project — Radxa
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Rockchip RK3188 (4x Cortex-A9 @ 1.6GHz); Mali-400 GPU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; 4GB NAND flash (2GB/8GB on Pro)
    • Price — $59 (Lite), $99 (Pro)

    The Radxa Rock Lite and Rock Pro run Android or Linux on the quad-core RK3188 SoC. The SBCs measure 100 x 80mm, and offer microSD, WiFi, HDMI, Ethernet, USB, and SPDIF connections. You also get 80 pins of expansion I/O. A $99 Pro version supplies twice the RAM, at 2GB, plus 8GB NAND flash, and Bluetooth.

     

    Radxa Rock 2 Square

    • Company/project — Radxa
    • Product page
    • Processor — Rockchip RK3288 (4x Cortex-A17 @ 1.6GHz); Mali-T764 GPU
    • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM (4GB on SOM-B model); 16GB eMMC flash (32GB on SOM-B model)
    • Price — $129

    Unlike the Radxa Rock Lite, the Radxa Rock 2 Square has a modular, sandwich-style design featuring a Rock 2 SOM computer-on-module. The Rock 2 SOM has a faster, quad-core Cortex-A17 RK3288 SoC, as well as 2-4GB RAM and up to 32GB flash, depending on whether you buy the SOM-A or SOM-B. The Square Baseboard supports microSD cards of up to 128GB, as well as SATA HDDs up to 4TB. It offers WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0 BLE, GbE, and four USB ports. You also get HDMI 2.0, SPDIF, and analog audio ports, as well as LVDS, eDP, IR, debug, and UART I/O. The SBC is currently out of stock, however, and activity on the site appears to have slowed.

     

    Raspberry Pi Zero

    • Company/project — Raspberry Pi Trading
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Broadcom BCM2835 (1x ARM1176JZFS core @ 1GHz) with FPU and VideoCore IV GPU
    • Memory — 512MB SDRAM
    • Price — $5 ($14 with Essentials kit)

    The Raspberry Pi Zero shocked the embedded world in November with a ground-breaking $5 price. Even when factoring in $9 to $20 more to add various cables and adapters, it’s a good deal, especially if you can benefit from the compact, 65 x 30mm footprint. The Zero upgrades the same ARM11 processor found on the Pi A+ and B+ to 1GHz speed, yet it seems more like a follow-on to the COM-like, $30 Raspberry Pi Compute Module. The Zero will likely see duty in small-run manufacturing as much as it will for casual home hacking. The tiny SBC ships with a microSD slot, a pair of micro-USB ports, and a mini-HDMI port with audio support, as well as an unpopulated composite video header. Missing are the USB ports, DSI port, and audio jack found on the Pi 2 and 3, but the latest models now have a CSI interface for a camera.

     

    Raspberry Pi 2 Model B

    • Company/project — Raspberry Pi Trading
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Broadcom BCM2836 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 900MHz); Broadcom VideoCore IV GPU @ 250MHz
    • Memory — 1GB SDRAM
    • Price — $35

    With the arrival of the Raspberry Pi Zero, 2, and 3, we’ve dropped the earlier ARM11-based Model B+ and Model A+ from our list, although they can still be found for as low as $13 and $23, respectively. Now that there’s a faster, WiFi capable RPi 3, the RPi 2 will be gone from our next roundup, as well. The main reason it’s still here is that it’s sometimes hard to find an RPi 3 selling for its official $35 price. The the RPi 2 was a big deal when it arrived in early 2015, replacing the 700MHz ARM11 Broadcom SoC with a 900MHz, quad-core, Cortex-A7 model. The RPi 2 is backward compatible with earlier Pi’s, while the faster SoC and 1GB of RAM supports more robust Linux OSes like Ubuntu. Aside from the CPU and RAM, the Pi 2 is almost identical to the Model B+, with the same I/O, size (85 x 56mm), weight (45 grams), and 40-pin expansion connector.

     

    Raspberry Pi 3 Model B

    • Company/project — Raspberry Pi Foundation
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Broadcom BCM43437 (4x Cortex-53 @ 1.2GHz); Broadcom VideoCore IV GPU @ 400MHz
    • Memory — 1GB SDRAM
    • Price — $35

    Supply appears to have finally caught up with demand for the sizzling hot Raspberry Pi 3, and it can currently be found in stock at MCM Electronics, for example, at the official $35 price. The first 64-bit RPi gives you everything the RPi 2 does at the same price, and adds a much faster processor plus WiFi and Bluetooth. A few other boards can beat it on price, performance, and features, and many of them offer RPI expansion compatibility, but they don’t offer the same thriving community and support.

     

    Rico Board

    • Company/project — MYIR
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — TI AM437x (1x Cortex-A9 core @ up to 1GHz); PowerVR SGX530 GPU
    • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM (alternatively 256MB or 1GB); 4GB eMMC flash
    • Price — $99

    MYIR’s open-spec, 100 x 65mm Rico Board taps TI’s single-core, Cortex-A9, Sitara AM437x SoC. The SBC integrates HDMI, GbE, and dual USB ports, as well as a 24-bit LCD interface that supports optional 7-inch touchscreens. Also available are camera interfaces and dual 40-pin expansion connectors with support for CAN and other industrial I/O. Note that MYIR offers numerous MYD-branded, sandwich-style development boards that are open spec, but aim more at the OEM market, such as the AM437x-based MYD-C437X.

     

    RioTboard

    • Company/project — Newark Element14, RioTboard.org
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Solo (1x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1GHz)
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM; 4GB eMMC
    • Price — $79

    The RioT (“Revolutionizing the Internet of Things”) board runs Android or Linux on a low-power, single-core Cortex-A9 SoC. The 120 x 75mm SBC offers several advantages over the similar Wandboard Solo, including twice the RAM, built-in flash, and many more USB ports.

     

    Roseapple Pi

    • Company/project — Roseapplepi.org
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Actions S500 (4x Cortex-A9 @ up to 1.6GHz); PowerVR SGX544 GPU
    • Memory — 2GB DDR3 RAM; 4GB to 64GB eMMC 4.5
    • Price – about $50

    This 85 x 56mm Raspberry Pi imitator uses the same Actions Semi Bubblegum-S500 reference design used on the LemonPi RPi clone. The board runs Linux or Android on the quad-core S500 SoC. The LemonPi, which shipped to Indiegogo backers in March after significant delays, does not appear to be heading for the general public, as Embed Studio now points users to Roseapplepi.org for support. The two boards are almost identical, although while Indiegogo backers got the LemonPi for $35 or less, the Roseapple Pi currently goes for a low of $50 at Asian sites like Uitrox. The Roseapple Pi SBC is equipped with HDMI 1.4, MIPI-CSI-2, audio, USB 3.0, and two USB 2.0 ports. Other features include a microSD slot, 10/100 Ethernet, and a Raspberry Pi-compatible 40-pin adapter. The board draws 5V/700mA power via a micro-USB port.

     

    SAMA5D4 Xplained

    • Company/project — Newark Element14, Atmel
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Atmel SAMA5D4 (1x Cortex-A5 @ 528MHz)
    • Memory — 512MB DDR2 RAM; 512MB NAND flash
    • Price — $94

    The SAMA5D4 Xplained is a collaboration between Atmel’s Linux4SAM developers site and Newark Element14. The Linux-ready, IoT-focused SBC showcases Atmel’s SAMA5D4, which like the earlier SAMA5D3, is limited to a single Cortex-A5 core. The SAMA5D4 adds NEON, L2 cache, and security features, and several models support 720p video. The 138 x 88mm Xplained board ships with 512MB each of RAM and NAND flash, and offers partial Arduino compatibility. You also get HDMI, Fast Ethernet, and three USB ports.

     

    Seeeduino Cloud

    • Company/project — SeeedStudio
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 (1x MIPS 24kc @ 400MHz); Atmel ATmega32u4 MCU @ 16MHz
    • Memory — 64MB RAM; 16MB flash; 32KB flash for MCU
    • Price — $70

    SeeedStudio’s Seeeduino Cloud Arduino Yún clone is a variation on its Seeduino Arduino clone, and similarly adds Arduino support and the ability to connect the company’s Grove sensor and I/O add-ons. By integrating Dragino’s HE computer-on-module, the Seeeduino Cloud provides a Yún-like Atheros AR9331 WiFi subsystem that runs OpenWrt Linux. Other features include a 10/100 Ethernet port, USB host port, a micro-USB port, 20x DIO pins, seven PWM channels, and 12 analog inputs. Like the Seeduino, the Seeeduino Cloud eases the interface between Arduino firmware and complex web services, in this case via a YúnBridge library that delegates all network connections and processing of HTTP transactions to the Linux machine.

     

    Snickerdoodle

    • Company/project — Krtkl
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Xilinx Zynq-7010 or for $60 more, 866MHz -7020 SoC (2x Cortex-A9 @ 667MHz plus FPGA); STM32 MCU
    • Memory — 512MB or 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $62 or $72 (1GB)

    The delayed Snickerdoodle is now set to ship to Crowd Supply backers on June 29, and the $72 1GB version can be bought today with the same shipping deadline. Aimed primarily at drone and robot developers, the 89 x 51mm SBC runs Linux on a Zynq ARM/FPGA SoC. The pricier Zynq-7020 option is the same as the -7010 on the Linux side, but offers greater FPGA capability. The Snickerdoodle ships with a TI Wilink 8 wireless module, and offers a microSD slot, a micro-USB port, and a 3.7 to 17V supply. The numerous options include homegrown “MicroShield” expansion boards such as a general breakout, an Arduino baseboard, and a $55 PiSmasher baseboard that adds GbE, USB, HDMI, and 68 GPIOs. Other Snickerdoodle based options include a $300 Gryphon drone autopilot and a $500 WhiteRhino industrial baseboard.

     

    Udoo Neo

    • Company/project — Udoo (Seco)
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 SoloX (1x Cortex-A9 @ 1GHz); Cortex-M4 MCU; Vivante GPU
    • Memory — 512MB DDR3L RAM (1GB on Plus version)
    • Price — $50 (Basic) $60 (Extended), $65 (Full)

    Like the larger Udoo Quad/Dual SBCs, the IoT-focused, 85 x 59mm Udoo Neo runs Linux or Android on a Cortex-A9-based i.MX6. The Neo, however, is optimized for the single-core i.MX6 SoloX, and uses the SoC’s Cortex-M4 MCU to mimic an Arduino. The specs differ slightly from the Kickstarter package referenced in the LinuxGizmos link above. The Udoo Neo Basic provides Ethernet, microSD, USB host, micro-USB OTG, micro-HDMI, LVDS with touch, and a Parallel camera interface. There’s also an Arduino connector, GPIO, and UART, CAN, PWM, I2C, and SPI interfaces. For $10 more, the Neo Extended bumps the RAM to 1GB, adds 3-axis motion sensors, and replaces Ethernet with a WiFi/Bluetooth module. The Neo Full is identical to the Extended, but offers both Ethernet and wireless. Udoo recently tried its hand at the x86 world with an open-spec, Atom x5-E8000-based Udoo X86 SBC, due to ship to Kickstarter backers in November.

     

    Udoo Quad / Dual / Dual Basic

    • Company/project — Udoo (Seco)
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Quad or DualLite (4x or 2x Cortex-A9 @ 1GHz with Vivante GPUs); Atmel SAM3X8E Cortex-M3 MCU
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $99 (Dual Basic); $115 (Dual); $135 (Quad)

    Seco’s Udoo project offers three SKUs for its mainstream Udoo board. They all measure 110 x 85mm, and are enhanced with a Cortex-M3 based Arduino Due subsystem. The Udoo Dual Basic and Udoo Dual provide the dual-core i.MX6 DualLite while the Quad has the quad-core i.MX6 with a higher-end Vivante GPU. The Dual Basic supplies microSD, HDMI, LVDS with touch, audio, and CSI connections along with dual USB host and dual micro-USB ports, one of which is OTG. There are 76 GPIO pins in addition to the Arduino interface. The Udoo Dual adds WiFi and GbE connections, and the Quad also adds SATA.

     

    USB Armory

    • Company/project — Inverse Path
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX53 (1x Cortex-A8 @ 800MHz)
    • Memory — 512MB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $130; $155 (with USB host adapter); $185 (with adapter and 32GB microSD with Debian)

    This tiny (65 x 19mm), Crowd Supply funded SBC for secure computing applications has dropped in price to $100 (or $110 with optional USB host adapter), down from $130/$155. The USB Armory features Trustzone security, USB emulation, and a secure boot feature that lets users apply verification keys that ensure only trusted firmware can be executed on a specific device. The SBC is limited to two real-world ports: a USB 2.0 OTG port and a microSD slot, but you can extend that with the adapter.

     

    Wandboard

    • Company/project — Wandboard.org
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Solo, DualLite, or Quad (1x, 2x, or 4x Cortex-A9 @ 1GHz); Vivante GPU
    • Memory — 512MB (Solo) 1GB (Dual), 2GB (Quad) DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $79 (Solo); $99 (Dual); $129 Quad

    The aging, and somewhat pricy Wandboard remains surprisingly popular (#17 in our May 2015 survey), thanks in large part to its still lively open board community, which churns out frequent software updates, such as its April 29 Android 6.0 “Marshmallow” release. The Wandboard is designed as a modular, sandwich-style, COM+baseboard assembly featuring a replaceable compute module. Features include dual microSD slots, analog and SPDIF audio, plus GbE, HDMI, camera, serial, USB, and USB OTG connections. The Dual lacks the Quad’s SATA connection, and the Solo also foregoes the WiFi and Bluetooth found on the Quad and Dual. Wandboard.org recently released a Brillo-ready, i.MX6 UltraLite based HobbitBoard (see farther above).

     

    Z-turn Board

    • Company/project — MYIR
    • LinuxGizmos coverage
    • Product page
    • Processor — Xilinx Zynq-7010 or -7020 (2x Cortex-A9 cores @ 667MHz, plus FPGA) or optional Zynq-7020
    • Memory — 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • Price — $99 (7010) or $119 (7020)

    The Z-turn Board runs Linux on the Xilinx Zynq-7010 or -7020, which combine dual Cortex-A9 cores with different levels of FPGA circuitry. The 102 x 63mm SBC features HDMI, GbE, and dual mini-USB ports, as well as a variety of sensors, buzzers, switches, buttons, and LEDs. Dual 80-pin expansion connectors express the FPGA signals, and can be configured as LVDS pairs. A $139 kit version adds a power adapter, cables, and a 4GB data card.
     

     

    The 2016 Hacker SBC Survey has concluded, but the real fun is just beginning!
     
    Click here for the survey’s detailed results, including charts and analysis:
    2016 Hacker SBC Survey Results
     
    Click here for a PDF table comparing the specs of all 81 hacker SBCs:
    2016 Hacker SBCs Comparison Table

     

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    PLEASE COMMENT BELOW

    20 responses to “Catalog of 81 open-spec, hacker friendly SBCs”

    1. Fabrizio says:

      Hi,

      you miss UP ( http://www.up-board.org / http://www.up-shop.com).
      It is an ultra compact board, with layout very similar to Raspberry Pi2 but powered by Intel x5-8350, 1/2/4 GB RAM on board, 16/32/64 HighPerf eMMC on Board, 1 GBit LAN, 1 USB 3.0, 6 USB ( 2 on pin header ), CSI, eDP/DSI port, HDMI and 40 pin expansion connector controlled by Altera CPLD and with similar I/O of Raspberry Pi2. This permits customers to use several Rpi2 expansions/HAT module.
      Cheers

      Fabrizio

      • LinuxGizmos says:

        Hi Fabrizio,

        The UP board seems to be a great product, but we could not include it, due to the lack of publicly available schematics for the board, in accordance with the definition of “open spec” single-board computers that we use for this annual survey.

        Best regards,
        Rick

    2. Charles Steinkuehler says:

      I believe the DE0-Nano-SoC from Terasic (Based on the Cyclone-V SoC+FPGA) fits your criteria, and provides lots of “hackable” 0.1″ headers to use with those FPGA gates!

    3. luke says:

      Where is VoCore? (VoCore.io)

    4. Roman Lavriv says:

      Is there a way to find out which of those do support 4K output over HDMI/DP?

    5. sidboyce says:

      ODROID-C2 is my favourite. Currently using 2 with 7 inch touch screens.

    6. Enno says:

      All these options and still not a single board with more than one ethernet socket. Which is sad as one of these guys with pfSense or something similar would make a killer open firewall/router for home use and embedded scenarios. It would also be a great differentiator in a market that is essentially over-populated with “me too” derivatives.

      • macemoneta says:

        A second gig-e is what I was searching for as well, for the same reason. The best you can do with these is use an SBC with a USB3.0 port to add a gig-e adapter, which is a little kludgy (and raises the price).

        With companies like Ubiquiti selling standalone access points, there’s no reason the routing function shouldn’t be completely open. Since many of these SBCs even run full off-the-shelf mainstream distributions and mainline kernels, there’s no reason a router needs to run OpenWRT/DD-WRT anymore.

        It also gets around the FCC router radio lockdown requirement, since the APs are fully separate from the router.

        • Santiago says:

          What are the SBC that ” run full off-the-shelf mainstream distributions and mainline kernels”? Os there a list of such SBC?

          • Douglas Kryder says:

            minnowboard turbot is one.

          • macemoneta says:

            I like the PCDuino Nano or Nano Lite. The Nano Lite was on sale recently for $15 with free shipping, so I picked up three. Very nice, and they run Fedora 24 unmodified. It’s actually faster to install on this board than a desktop. :)

    7. Przemek Klosowski says:

      I have compiled the summary of the boards into a spreadsheet:
      https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1fAKrvns9weUVMMaE1CmbCmgdHGMB257Fk83GZUJUlpQ/edit?usp=sharing

    8. Jan Hieber says:

      Nice list.
      You forgot the MarS Board by Embest (with i.MX6 CPU): http://www.embest-tech.com/shop/star/marsboard.html

      On sale you can get in for 60€ in Germany, very good for such a powerful i.MX6dual CPU.

      I have OpenELEC/LibreELEC running, works very good.
      Support:
      – The images they are shipping are total crap
      – UBoot has mainline support, just need to compile it (its easy)
      – Kernel has mainline support, you just need a device tree file (contact me on github: janhieber)

    9. james says:

      Why Raspberry Pi zero is listed $15 when it is $5? All these list are not including shipping so Pi zero is written so expensive? Are you siding to any brands? I saw it is.

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